Andre Barrett's Girlfriend

Discussion forum for Andre Barrett's girlfriend (Maine Red Claws, NBDL). Does Andre Barrett have a girlfriend? Is he dating someone? Is he married? Single? Divorced? Would you date him? Did you date him? Who is his wife? His fiance? Please do not post inappropriate comments, this is a friendly forum for fans. If you see inappropriate comments, then please report them by clicking the report abuse link aside the comment. Please report any comments that suggest the person is gay or had sex with anybody or has an STD. Comments you post may require a paid membership to delete.

Anonymous (Rookie) wrote on Mon, 17 Jun 2019 02:28:51 GMT reply
She spent the day with him. That’s her boo y’all. Go to her ig @elizabetflores she’s bowling with mamma B. Don’t get it twisted. It’s all her
Anonymous (Rookie) wrote on Mon, 17 Jun 2019 00:31:46 GMT reply
st Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjrUffufufSidjn
Anonymous (Rookie) wrote on Mon, 17 Jun 2019 00:31:38 GMT reply
st Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjrUffufufDidj
Anonymous (Rookie) wrote on Mon, 17 Jun 2019 00:31:31 GMT reply
st Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjrUffufufB
Anonymous (Rookie) wrote on Sun, 16 Jun 2019 14:05:07 GMT reply
Him and his father are on her ig story, they are for sure a couple.. I feel bad for her, she’s all in and he’s not claiming her. What a jerk!!!
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:56:47 GMT reply
't just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjrUffufuf
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:56:39 GMT reply
Iffiduud't just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjr
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:56:18 GMT reply
Y. Ucuciciivt just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:56:11 GMT reply
Tyyxcuuchct just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:55:55 GMT reply
Txcyuccucut just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:55:32 GMT reply
Yhgds't just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjr
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:55:23 GMT reply
Rhjfd't just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjr
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:55:15 GMT reply
Gyhjf't just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjr
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:54:35 GMT reply
Didnf g t just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:54:27 GMT reply
Djbbjnoklt just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:54:19 GMT reply
Ahducnfnt just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:54:05 GMT reply
Sndbdbfb't just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjr
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:53:57 GMT reply
Djrnfb't just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjr
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:53:50 GMT reply
Djdjfnfb't just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjrkdnd
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:53:17 GMT reply
Sdnxjfnt just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:52:59 GMT reply
Dndndn firstt just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:52:50 GMT reply
Djdjfnt just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:51:43 GMT reply
't just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjrHerjnbr
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:51:35 GMT reply
Me't just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjr
Anonymous (Sophomore) wrote on Sat, 15 Jun 2019 03:51:27 GMT reply
't just Joshua who suffered a defeat. Deontay Wilder was a big loser too. While Wilder might eventually face Joshua in the future, that fight will never have quite the same importance or buzz as it did for the past year, when both were undefeated heavyweight titleholders.
Before this fateful weekend, if you had asked most boxing fans, both hard-core and casual, which fight they would most like to see in 2019, the answer probably would have been Joshua vs. Wilder. And now, after all the public posturing and promotional machinations that took place between the two sides, the two fighters and fans alike are now left with the possibility of nothing.
This was somewhat reminiscent of another monumental heavyweight upset -- when James "Buster" Douglas defeated Mike Tyson in February 1990. Sitting ringside that night in Tokyo was Evander Holyfield, who was waiting in the wings for Tyson to take care of business so that Holyfield could face "Iron Mike" for an eight-figure payday in what would have been a matchup of two well-known and undefeated heavyweights in their physical primes.
ESPN Stats & Information
A pairing between Joshua and Wilder as undefeated heavyweight champions would have been one of the rare events in which boxing would've taken center stage on an international level.
Perhaps Wilder is finding a sense of satisfaction out of all this, given the acrimony of what has been an all-too-public negotiation with Joshua. But there has to be a part of him that is frustrated that the opportunity to be the first man to make the London Bridge fall down has evaporated, along with a career-high payday.Sod forEHehdSushdnPHgfssyhggcdasggLGnjrForgive
More Comments...

If the editor doesn't load, then click the button below or refresh the page.

Load Editor
Bold Italic Underline Left Center Right Ordered List Bulleted List Hyperlink Image
Smiley Face Heart
Big Smile
Smiley Tongue
Surprised

Link to this webpage

Get this forum in your email inbox.

via reblinks
Find a Player

About Us Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms of Service DivorceIt.ca